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    From curing Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s to eliminating cancer deaths, no goal has been too ambitious for the best minds in medicine to claim is within reach thanks to the latest scientific discovery. This three-part series of documentary shorts, produced by Retro Report in partnership with STAT, looks back at the roots of three of today’s most promising genetic technologies: genetic testing to predict which diseases someone might develop, precision medicine to match people’s genes to the treatments most likely to work for them, and genome-editing via CRISPR to repair disease-causing genes.Watch and listen to experts explain how the 1980s and 1990s version of each was going to change medicine and save lives. The

    From curing Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s to eliminating cancer deaths, no goal has been too ambitious for the best minds in medicine to claim is within reach thanks to the latest scientific discovery. This three-part series of documentary shorts, produced by Retro Report in partnership with STAT, looks back at the roots of three of today’s most promising genetic technologies: genetic testing to predict which diseases someone might develop, precision medicine to match people’s genes to the treatments most likely to work for them, and genome-editing via CRISPR to repair disease-causing genes.

    Watch and listen to experts explain how the 1980s and 1990s version of each was going to change medicine and save lives. The $1.455 billion “All of Us” project that the National Institutes of Health is launching this spring stands on the shoulders of the $3 billion Human Genome Project, which was (mostly) completed in 2003.

    All of Us will collect DNA, health, lifestyle, and other data from 1 million Americans to, among other things, identify the genetic and environmental roots of disease and understand why different people respond differently to the same drug.

    The scientists behind All of Us, the most prominent part of the government’s precision medicine initiative, believe they can make the promise of the genome project a reality even as they are careful not to overpromise.

    “When something truly significant is discovered,” said NIH Director Francis Collins, a veteran of both projects, “its consequences are overestimated in the short term and underestimated in the long term.” By now, you’ve probably heard of CRISPR.

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    From curing Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s to eliminating cancer deaths, no goal has been too ambitious for the best minds in medicine to claim is within reach thanks to the latest scientific discovery. This three-part series of documentary shorts, produced by Retro Report in partnership with STAT, looks back at the roots of three of today’s most promising genetic technologies: genetic testing to predict which diseases someone might develop, precision medicine to match people’s genes to the treatments most likely to work for them, and genome-editing via CRISPR to repair disease-causing genes.Watch and listen to experts explain how the 1980s and 1990s version of each was going to change medicine and save lives. The $1.455 billion “All of Us” project that the National Institutes of Health is launching this spring stands on the shoulders of the $3 billion Human Genome Project, which was (mostly) completed in 2003.All of Us will collect DNA, health, lifestyle, and other data from 1 million Americans to, among other things, identify the genetic and environmental roots of disease and understand why different people respond differently to the same drug.The scientists behind All of Us, the most prominent part of the government’s precision medicine initiative, believe they can make the promise of the genome project a reality even as they are careful not to overpromise.“When something truly significant is discovered,” said NIH Director Francis Collins, a veteran of both projects, “its consequences are overestimated in the short term and underestimated in the long term.” By now, you’ve probably heard of CRISPR.Rest assured that everything you find located on my dating archive above is of the up-most highest quality the dating industry has to offer.hose who do not remember the past are doomed to repeat it.The best almost never happened: The first gene-therapy patient, who has an inherited metabolic disorder called ADA deficiency, saw the therapeutic benefits of receiving healthy genes decrease with time and was never able to stop taking the medication for her disease.The worst did happen, and the death of a young patient in a prominent gene therapy trial brought the field to a year-long halt.Dive into a dangerous post-apocalyptic world in this thrilling action shooter zombie game. Of course, they must know that a desperate stick man like you would use all of your anti-gravity suits, laser guns, and cannons to break into this museum ...Your goal is to survive, save others and rebuild civilization. Brainstorm the ultimate scheme to bust your way outta jail and watch as this point and click puzzle adventure unfolds with one of 3 different escape endings and a whole lot of death scenes! Your mission, if you should choose to accept it is too infiltrate the floating airship and destroy the inhabitants!People can learn whether they inherited a disease-causing mutation and take steps to avert the disease, either through intense screening (for colon cancer, say) or prophylactic surgery (if they carry a gene for breast or ovarian cancer, for instance).While detecting mutations is easy, understanding what mutations mean has proved to be anything but.But maybe you didn’t know (or forgot) that the flashy genome-editing technique has a forebear: gene therapy.

    .455 billion “All of Us” project that the National Institutes of Health is launching this spring stands on the shoulders of the billion Human Genome Project, which was (mostly) completed in 2003.All of Us will collect DNA, health, lifestyle, and other data from 1 million Americans to, among other things, identify the genetic and environmental roots of disease and understand why different people respond differently to the same drug.The scientists behind All of Us, the most prominent part of the government’s precision medicine initiative, believe they can make the promise of the genome project a reality even as they are careful not to overpromise.“When something truly significant is discovered,” said NIH Director Francis Collins, a veteran of both projects, “its consequences are overestimated in the short term and underestimated in the long term.” By now, you’ve probably heard of CRISPR.Rest assured that everything you find located on my dating archive above is of the up-most highest quality the dating industry has to offer.hose who do not remember the past are doomed to repeat it.The best almost never happened: The first gene-therapy patient, who has an inherited metabolic disorder called ADA deficiency, saw the therapeutic benefits of receiving healthy genes decrease with time and was never able to stop taking the medication for her disease.The worst did happen, and the death of a young patient in a prominent gene therapy trial brought the field to a year-long halt.Dive into a dangerous post-apocalyptic world in this thrilling action shooter zombie game. Of course, they must know that a desperate stick man like you would use all of your anti-gravity suits, laser guns, and cannons to break into this museum ...Your goal is to survive, save others and rebuild civilization. Brainstorm the ultimate scheme to bust your way outta jail and watch as this point and click puzzle adventure unfolds with one of 3 different escape endings and a whole lot of death scenes! Your mission, if you should choose to accept it is too infiltrate the floating airship and destroy the inhabitants!People can learn whether they inherited a disease-causing mutation and take steps to avert the disease, either through intense screening (for colon cancer, say) or prophylactic surgery (if they carry a gene for breast or ovarian cancer, for instance).While detecting mutations is easy, understanding what mutations mean has proved to be anything but.But maybe you didn’t know (or forgot) that the flashy genome-editing technique has a forebear: gene therapy.

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